How to build a deck porch

By Milkree | 07.09.2020

how to build a deck porch

Start Your Deck Project

Mar 25,  · Building a deck with pressure treated wood is a common way to make sure your new outdoor space withstands the elements. Wood gives the deck a natural appeal, and you can tailor the look with a wide range of exterior stains. Watch our wood deck construction project from start to finish or see step-by-step instructions for each part of the. Jan 06,  · In this video we build 3 porches with steps, handrails, and a deck. I hope you enjoy!

By clicking GO! A front porch can be a graceful addition to a home, giving you a place to enjoy your neighborhood and surroundings in the fresh air.

While it serves a similar purpose as a deck, how to build a deck porch may be wondering what is the difference between a porch and a deck how to make a business website with wordpress it comes to building. In general, building a porch can be a more involved process compared to building a deck.

Building a porch can also be more expensive than building a deck, as well as more complicated. Porches need to be designed to support 80 lbs per square what is the signs of west nile virus, compared to 55 lbs per square foot for decks.

This extra 25 lbs per square foot is required to safely support the roof and snow loads. Footings are often required on the sides of porches that use a gable porch roof. Footing sizes are larger and need to be positioned so that support posts can directly transfer roof loads through sound framing to solid foundations. Unlike a deck, a porch may require a roof. A deck is typically attached to a home or can be a free-standing structure that is open on all sides.

A porch is typically enclosed on three of its four sides and, because it juts out from the front of a house, is often situated beneath a roof or overhang that is part of the house. Adding a roof to a porch can be a complicated project and hard work. You will need a couple of helpers to build a porch, as this project definitely demands more skill and physical conditioning than building a typical deck project.

Knowing the steps involved can help you be prepared if you decide that a front porch will add value and enjoyment to your home. However, there are a variety of practical matters to consider, such as how much it costs to build a porch and if you need permits.

Below are step-by-step instructions for adding a porch to an existing house. Adding a front porch to your home can give you a new outdoor living room, it can also cut off the light inside your home. Do you have a sunny breakfast nook that you love? Consider its location before choosing to build a porch that will reduce the sunlight flooding in if you want the let the how to catch baby skunks in.

A Victorian home calls for a very different sort of porch than a s bungalow. If you live in a historic home or a historic district, you should definitely visit your city building and planning office to find out if there are regulations you need to follow. Historic homes may have limits as to the type of materials that can be used. For instance, if your home was built in the s, some areas have laws that you cannot use certain materials such as vinyl screening or composite decking to craft a porch.

Even modern neighborhoods with newer homes may have certain restrictions, so check with your neighborhood association or township before you start building. Getting all of your approvals up-front is one of the biggest steps toward building your porch. Before you start building, you want to evaluate the existing look, style, structure, and materials of your home.

Make sure everything matches up. Some porches are a simple wooden raised how to install shingle roof with a plain railing and a roof - like you would find on a farmhouse. Other porches have turned balustrades. It all depends on what looks right on your home. When building a porch foundation, assess your terrain, the porch size, and the climate where you live.

The larger the porch, the more the foundation your footings will need to support. If you live in a snowy climate, the footings will need to sit below the frost line to remain stable and so your porch can accommodate snow without buckling. You may need to call the local utility company to find out if there are any cables buried under your future porch before you start laying your foundation. Install a ledger board on your house to support the porch.

Then, use an auger or post digger to dig the holes for the footings. If you live in a colder region, you may need to dig down four feet to prevent frost heavings. Place the foundation tube in the hole, pour in the cement, and secure with rebar. Your porch framing will attach to these posts. When framing your front porch, start with the perimeter beams. Lay them out on top of the porch foundation and nail the end beams together. The joists go on top of the foundation beams and support your front porch flooring.

The distance depends on the size of your porch, and the recommendations from the decking manufacturer on allowable joist spacing. Use a pencil to mark where the railing posts will go around the porch edge. Attach the decking allowing for a small space in between each board. The decking will have a slight overhang from the edge. Later, you may want to sand your how to build a deck porch front porch and clean up any stray pieces in preparation to paint or stain it, if that is part of your plans.

During the early planning stages of your porch, you decided on the style of front porch railings to give your porch a cohesive look that works with the facade of your home. Start by adding a ledger board to the porch posts for stability.

Next, add the stringers for the stairs. Then add the risers. Please note that in some instances, treads may sometimes need to be installed before the risers.

Porch roofs usually have a shallow slope that allows for ample headroom. Your porch roof covering - metal, asphalt shingles, or other roofing material, looks best when it matches your home roof, so certainly keep this in mind when developing a coherent aesthetic for your new porch.

Proper finishing will help your porch stay fresh looking for years to come. You can see more pictures of porches here. A front porch offers an elegant entry and beauty to your home. You can see porch plans and designs to choose your new front porch. Skip to search Skip to main content. Range 10 Mi 25 Mi 50 Mi Go!

Step 1: Assess Your Location Adding a front porch to your home can give you a new outdoor living room, it can also cut off the light inside your home. Step 3: Plan Your Railings, Steps, and Porch Stair Railing Before you start building, you want to evaluate the existing look, style, structure, and materials of your home.

Step 5: Consider Your Porch Foundation When building a porch foundation, assess your terrain, the porch size, and the climate where you live. Step 7: Frame Your Porch When framing your front porch, start with the perimeter beams. Step 8: Install the Joists The joists go on top of the foundation beams and support your front porch flooring. Step 9: Add the Railing Posts Use a pencil to mark where the railing posts will go around the porch edge.

Step Add the Porch Floor or Decking Attach the decking allowing for a small space in between each board. Step Build the Railings During the early planning stages of your porch, you decided on the style of front porch railings to give your porch a cohesive look that works with the facade of your home.

Step Build the Porch Roof Porch roofs usually have a shallow slope that allows for ample headroom. Previous Article: Parts of a Porch.

Building A Front Porch: Steps for Adding a Porch to Your House

Jul 05,  · We are starting off another backyard transformation in this video as we frame the main deck area and begin to build the screen porch. Next up will be buildin. Sep 10,  · If the porch has no railings, the deck railings should be as visually light as possible. Where the railing meets the house, there should be a wall at least as tall as the railing. The railing can terminate directly into the wall, but it looks best when it ends at a postlike pilaster or a post held 2 in. to 3 in. from the siding. Building a porch can also be more expensive than building a deck, as well as more complicated. Porches need to be designed to support 80 lbs per square foot, compared to 55 lbs per square foot for decks. This extra 25 lbs per square foot is required to safely support the roof and snow loads.

Last Updated: September 14, References. This article was co-authored by Walter Brant. Walter Brant is a wikiHow community member and contributor who has been repairing and restoring houses with over 30 years of experience. He works with homeowners to make a wide variety of improvements to make their homes more comfortable and liveable. There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 88, times. Adding a railing to your deck is a great way to give it a finished look. Just make sure to check with your local planning and building department first to see if you need any permits or if there are building requirements you'll need to meet. To build a deck railing, start by figuring out how many posts you need, then cut your wood to size and install the posts.

Next, mark the railing height on the posts with a pencil and double-check the distance between the posts. Then, buy balusters and wood according to your measurements or cut the wood down to size yourself.

Finally, position the balusters, attach them to 2 thin strips of wood, and screw the balusters assembly in place. For tips on how and when to apply finish to your wood, read on! Did this summary help you?

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Tips and Warnings. Things You'll Need. Related Articles. Article Summary. Part 1 of Count how many posts you will need. Your deck might already be supported by posts, especially if it is covered. Plan to evenly space posts around the perimeter of your deck, such as every 6 feet 1.

Thus, if one side of your deck is 16 ft 4. If you are building a PVC railing, the posts should be no further apart than 6 ft 1. Also, the PVC railings you want may only come in 6 ft 1.

Measure out the posts. Cut 4x4s to be at least a little higher than the railing will be, plus extra length to hang below the deck planks. For instance, if you want a railing that is 36 inches 91 cm high, cut posts that are perhaps 44 inches cm high.

The posts' extra height above the railing is just for looks. An inch or two higher than the railing will look nice. You'll need enough length hanging below the surface of the deck to attach the posts securely to the supports. For instance, if your deck is made of boards that are 1 inch 2. Cut the posts to have an overhang.

Mark a line that goes several inches up the side of the bottom of each post. For instance, if you want your 4x4 posts to hang 4 inches 10 cm over the edge of your deck, draw a line that far up the side, 2 inches 5.

Draw another line perpendicular to the first line's end. Use a saw and cut along the lines you drew to remove a section of the post that is 2 inches 5. Apply finish to the posts. If you plan on finishing your deck rail, go ahead and apply the finish to the posts before installing. Brush the paint or stain on all sides of the posts and let them dry about 24 hours. Mount the posts. Hold a post in the position where it will be mounted.

Use a large level to hold it in a vertical position—you may need someone to help you do this. Next, use a drill to drill pilot holes through the overhang of the posts into the deck joists. Then, drill lag screws or carriage bolts into the pilot holes. Washers are used only on the ends of the bolts with the nuts. If the posts will be higher than the railing the railings will not be nailed to the tops of the posts , nail a metal or wooden post cap onto the top of the railing.

This prevents water from entering at the top. Part 2 of Mark the railing height on the posts. Using a tape measure, make a pencil mark in the center of each post. This will probably be between between 36 inches 91 cm and 42 inches cm , according to your preference and building codes.

Many homeowners like to leave a couple of inches open below the bottom of the railing. To compensate for this, set the railing height mark slightly higher than the height of the railing itself. That will leave enough room for the balusters, the top and bottom of the rail, and a couple inches open at the bottom. Measure the distance between the posts. Stretch the tape measure tightly across to the center of the next post and make a mark. Record the distance between the posts.

Check the distance where you want the top and bottom rails to sit. If your posts are straight, the distance should be the same.

If they're not, change the length of the rails to match the actual distance. Get balusters and wood for the handrail. Take a trip down to the lumber supply store. You can also ask the supply store to cut it to size for you. If you're cutting the rails and handrails yourself, use a miter saw.

Cut 1x3 or 2x4 lumber into lengths equal to the distance between your deck posts. Get plenty of 2x2 balusters to use for the railing. The length of the balusters should be approximately the height you want the railing to be. Get something that is about 0.

Cut it into lengths equal to the distance between the deck posts. Finish all of the wooden pieces. If you want to apply a finish to your deck, such as a coat of polyurethane or paint, do this before assembly. Coat all of the pieces on all sides, and let them dry for about 24 hours. That way, the pieces will be more protected from weather conditions.

If it is not pressure treated, paint the cut surface with exterior paint. If it is pressure treated, press clear exterior caulk into the surface. Really push the paint or caulk into place, because you want it to fill all of the pores.

Make sure you've finished cutting, sanding and drilling everything before you apply a finish. Let the finish dry completely before assembly to avoid smudges. Part 3 of Attach balusters near the ends of a thin strip of wood. Most building codes require that balusters are no more than 4 inches 10 cm apart.

So, if you want them to be 3 inches 7. Screw the square end of one baluster to the flat surface 3 inches 7. Position the other balusters and attach them to the strip. Space the other balusters evenly along the strip between the two you already attached. Drive screws that are 1. If measuring out the place for each baluster seems too tedious, take advantage of an online deck railing calculator to do the hard work for you.

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